Friday, November 25, 2016

Pinned (Not A Political Post)


Don't mind the lint on my black coat.

Most people have heard that some are wearing a safety pin.  I have read a lot about the Why and Why Not to wear one.  Then I read a recount of a lady that was wearing one and was approached in the grocery story by a woman and her small daughter who spoke broken english.  She asked questions about preparing a turkey and dressing.  The pin wearing lady was glad to offer conversation and advice.  When done, the little girl looked up at the lady  and pointed to the pin  and said that she had told her mother it would be okay to ask her.

Stories like this fill my heart with joy.  I AM that person wearing the pin.  A stranger might not know it because my facial expression is a frown.  I don't know why my lips turn down.  When I think of it, I turn them up.  Why isn't it normal for me?  Anyway, I decided to add a pin to my coat.  For good measure I added a heart charm.  I want people to know I am approachable.  That I am willing to be helpful.  It's not a political statement.  It's a personal one.

I'd be interested to hear you thoughts about wearing a safety pin whether they are political or not. If your comment is rude, I'll read it, I might respond to it, but I WILL delete it.

22 comments:

  1. Well.... I'am one of those few people then that have not heard a thing about wearing a safety pin... If i saw it on someone i would wonder why the heck they have a safety pin on...lol I guess i'm just out of the loop..But then i don't watch the news much or read newspapers...so that probably exlplains it... So now at least i'll know what its for when i see it... i haven't seen any yet while i'm out and about... I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving Carol!!! Hugs! deb

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  2. Nice, Carol. No rudeness from me except to offer that your perennial frown might just be due to gravity? I know my once cheerful face now has jowls and something less than a smile. It happens to all of us regardles how we feel! ;)

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  3. Hi Carol i hadnt heard of this before ,its good to know that people wearing one are approachable.

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  4. I haven't heard of the pin wearing. Is it just in the US or all over? I'll try to notice anyone here in Japan wearing a pin. Nice that you were able to help!

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  5. Good morning, interesting twist on the political reason for the safety pin which I find very immature and divides our nation instead of both sides working together to unite us--but this story is a good one especially I like adding a heart charm and working at smiling more--as human beings and Americans of our great nation, we need to love one another more and help each other more
    Hope your Thanksgiving was a good one

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  6. Well-guess I'll have to google this-I must be way out in the boondocks because I haven't heard about it. I do watch Fox news a lot-but don't read any newspaper. I bet my husband will know....I love the heart pin, and the story-thank you!

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  7. Way to go Carol, I don't know about the safety pin thing either. But your reasons are good ones.

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  8. Oh yes! My decision too is a personal one. There is no room for those who would stand by and let someone be abused or confused. Or society is so mixed now we have people from all over the world coming here and who have been here. How can you be so blind/selfish not to help?
    Basic human decency are and have always been the same. Love thy neighbor. Do unto others as you would have done unto yourself.
    Do as you will though Harm none.

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  9. I'm so out of it, I didn't understand why your post was labeled not political. I thought, what could be political about this? I see people can turn anything into politics, if they want to! I will search one out this week, must be one around here somewhere! I will wear it because I do support compassion to all people, and don't blame a majority for the acts of a minority. I will wear it because I already have helped refugees through donating items needed to furnish apartments for them here in my hometown, and other activities all my life.

    I won't wear it to protest anything or be divided from anyone. I won't wear it to be an activist or anti or pro anything except pro compassion. Most of the people without one are probably wondering why so many people have one! They're like me, clueless until I looked it up and read the NY Times article. I want those who see it, like the little girl who knew it would be safe to approach someone with a pin, to know I am simply willing to be helpful and reassuring.

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  10. I haven't heard of the safety pin symbol either but will research it today. Like Pamela, I live in Japan and things are different here. My mouth naturally turns down as well and my mother was always reminding me to "Smile!", which I still do to this day!

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  11. What a great affirmation that the safety pin movement is actually working. I'm wearing one on my coat (no heart though - will have to see if I have one to add because I really like that idea). I'm not wearing it to make any sort of political statement per se - my feeling is that it shows that love for other human beings is the most important thing - all political garbage aside. Now, having said that, I just read that the not-so-nice faction of humanity is now wearing them and that it could be used to lure children. It takes all kinds and it seems that no matter what you do someone will turn it to the dark side.

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  12. Love the Safety pin sentiment and the fact you were approached by someone in need of assistance, funny since I was a teen I always carried one or two safety pins in my wallet just in case. I am one of those people that smile all the time, so I am often approached in pubic and always try to assist. Thanks for stopping by my blog.

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  13. I have been very fortunate in my life -- and it has led me as an adult to always remember that the next person I see might become a good friend or I might be able to help that person even if its only with a smile. Because of recent events I'm even more aware of others -- and the fact that we all live together and we should do it with kindness and grace and love.

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  14. Kindness is always appreciated and worthwhile.

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  15. I have never heard of wearing the safety pin, either. I will have to look it up to see how it got started. Love the idea!

    My natural facial expression is a frown, too. I've been called The Serious One and almost always have people asking me why I frown so much! I try harder to smile more too.

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  16. Haven't heard of this! Cool idea! XO

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  17. The safety pin movement actually started in Australia in response to an act of terrorism targeting Muslims. Wearers wanted a way to show who was safe and approachable. It carried over to Europe and is now here. Unfortunately, as Mary Anne said, there are hate groups co-opting its use just for spite (or worse). And yes, smile! That reminds me of the opening line of a Crosby Stills & Nash song (Wooden Ships) that goes "If you smile at me I will understand, for that is something everybody everywhere does in the same language."

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  18. I love the idea behind it, but I do not wear one. When I am out and about, I make an effort to greet others with a friendly smile and a nod. Many people smile in response, which brightens my day.

    Stories like the one you shared warm my heart and break it a bit at the same time. It's pretty sad to know there is so much hatred out there that people do not feel safe. My husband and I lived overseas for a few years and had a few opportunities to experience how it feels to have someone look down at you, talk down to you, or treat you poorly because they consider you to be less than they are due to your nationality. Human behavior really does baffle me sometimes. Kindness can go such a long ways and makes you feel so much better inside.

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  19. I love this post. The story is great and I like how you are making the pin a personal attitude.

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  20. I think the pin is a great idea, though I have never seen one worn IRL. I don't know if people around hear would 'get it' but it's lovely that the child understood straight away and makes me think it would be good to wear one because you never know :)

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  21. Immersed in my work I had no idea about the existence of the safety pin movement, until I read this post. I would wear one if it makes a difference and significance. Now - completely out of line of the story, decades ago my mom had a thrilling nightmare and we had trouble waking her up from it - she was moaning and almost yelling and when finally me and sis managed to wake her up -she said a woman in her nightmare grabbed her by the hand and told her that if no one wakes her up next time, they'll take her with them. Now, mom is neither ignorant (former teacher ) nor superstitious, but an old wives tale says you wear a safety pin on your nightgown / pjs to ward off nightmares and she's been wearing one since. Better keep safe I say. Compared with the safety pin wearing movement - I think the general belief is ward off evil and bad energy.

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